TAG: transpiling

Publishing my first-ever npm packages

June 22, 2019 10:25 PM

by Andrew Zigler

I'm continuing to work on a few different Nuxt projects after creating this website, but I quickly hit a point where I was tempted to copy code that I had already created, so I paused my projects and returned to my website with the goal of compartmentalizing those useful bits for reuse. After all, this is why the JavaScript ecosystem has npm!

Web Components: spoils of the browser wars

February 28, 2019 8:24 PM

by Andrew Zigler

When we discuss the context of the “browser wars” we often focus just on how one particular browser can get an edge on its competitors by developing or supporting a new feature. While the growing pains of this process have made designing for differing browsers sometimes tedious and unreliable, the war seems to finally be coming to an end and it’s time to reap the rewards.

TIC-80 in JavaScript

March 3, 2018 8:42 PM

by Andrew Zigler

I set out to participate in this quarter’s #FC_JAM a few weeks ago. I scoped out the various fantasy consoles available, trying to find something lightweight and fun to use. Most fantasy consoles are written in C and accept Lua scripts, but I found that TIC-80 released JavaScript support and that instantly convinced me. Since I’ve been studying so much JavaScript, getting to stick with that language was the appealing choice. The console itself is all-inclusive, with a terminal, sound, sprite, and map editors, and with artificial restrictions of 240x136 pixels display, 16 color palette, 256 8x8 color sprites, and 4 channel sound.

Grow with Google: ES6

February 5, 2018 7:17 PM

by Andrew Zigler

Picking up where I left off in Part 2, I’m continuing my journey in the Grow with Google Challenge Scholarship for 2018. Last time I learned all about IndexedDB, but this part of the course taught me ES6, the 6th edition of JavaScript, which is widely used today (sometimes with other names, like ES2015 and Harmony). These lessons gave me a whole new perspective on the language, and they’ve answered many long-time questions I’ve had about the “magic” of JavaScript.