TAG: Node

Initial release of Pinwheel

January 26, 2019 8:25 PM

by Andrew Zigler

After about six months of work, my Pinwheel MUD engine (a variant of Ranvier) is finally in a usable, distributable state with the groundwork needed to add any variety of features. Up until now, I was rewriting all of the source files and making changes to the entities to support full persistence and a web server. I’ve also made numerous changes to the underlying architecture of the engine and reduced the discrepancies between player and non-player characters. As of now, it’s possible for someone to clone the repository, npm install, and with a single command launch a conjoined MUD-web server that’s ready for content and gameplay.

MUD Cookbook: design meets implementation

September 29, 2018 10:08 PM

by Andrew Zigler

Lately, I’ve had a laser focus that’s consumed me in my latest project, Pinwheel: a fork of Ranvier, a MUD engine in JavaScript. This fork started as a question: can I add a web server to a MUD engine? The answer—which I found out pretty quickly—is yes. With that done, I turned my attention to the rest of the code. I started to rip things out and move them around. Even after weeks of tinkering with it, I’m genuinely fascinated by how this stranger’s software works. Reorganizing the blocks bit by bit, rewriting some parts entirely… all of it is rewarding. The silent reflection of teaching yourself another person’s code is oddly zen-inducing.

Like minds that like MUDs

August 30, 2018 8:02 PM

by Andrew Zigler

In a recent post, I made the case for MUDs in modern times which explored the niche that MUDs occupy on the internet. As a longtime player of MUDs, I started learning to code in order to tinker with downloaded codebases, trying endlessly to run ancient makefiles and compile spaghetti code hobbled together by lots of strangers on SourceForge. It was fun, but hardly effective!

Building a Hexo theme: postmortem

December 29, 2017 7:14 PM

by Andrew Zigler

Recently I’ve had a desire to start blogging again, to help me reflect as I work on projects. It’s a hobby I’ve explored since my exposure to the internet over a decade ago, and I’ve always considered myself a casual blogger. In the past, I’ve used platforms like WordPress and Blogger for personal blogs that usually revolved around projects. This time, I’ve been compelled to start branding my own name and taking ownership of my internet presence. To this end, I wanted to build a blog for myself so I’d have full control and ownership of both the written content and the supporting code of my blog. Originally, I was looking into writing my own blogging platform in React, but ultimately I have no interest in building a product from scratch when there are already several great open source options. There was no reason to reinvent the wheel in this case!