Inzignia

Social artifacts and digital curiosities

Like minds that like MUDs

In a recent post, I made the case for MUDs in modern times which explored the niche that MUDs occupy on the internet. As a longtime player of MUDs, I started learning to code in order to tinker with downloaded codebases, trying endlessly to run ancient makefiles and compile spaghetti code hobbled together by lots of strangers on SourceForge. It was fun, but hardly effective!

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I finished my Udacity Mobile Web Specialist Nanodegree

I’ve just finished my Mobile Web Specialist course after completing my final project. I covered a lot of ground between the first project and the third one, including transforming a website into a performant offline-first web app. Each project stage was professionally evaluted and I received a line-by-line code review of my work, which wa really helpful for getting useful feedback. I managed to zip through the stages pretty quickly, because I had completed most of the lessons already through my scholarship program (all of the lessons in the Nanodegree are available for free). The course runs until the end of October but I’m now finished two months early.

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The case for MUDs in modern times

In the age of smart devices and instant entertainment, can a medium as old as MUDs survive? Driven entirely by text, these Multi-User Dimensions ― or Dungeons, or Domains, or so many other options that they’re often called MU* ― are virtual worlds that consist entirely of text. Often outfitted as RPG-style games, these platforms are also home to niche internet communities on the fringes of the web. The servers are accessed via a telnet client, which is easy enough to launch in a command line. But there are a few popular applications that many longtime players opt to use. They’re rather reminiscent of the various chat programs built up around the IRC protocol, and provide simple functionality like logging, colors, aliases, triggers, timers, and even mapping.

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